top of page

Puzzler's Nook

Creating puzzles that can help improve memory, concentration, and cognitive skills especially as we age.

profile.jpg

Meet Brenda Cyr, Founder of Puzzler's Nook

letters-of-the-english-alphabet-on-the-ends-of-woo-2023-11-27-05-18-45-utc.jpg

Hi there, I’m glad you found my website. Let me tell you a bit about myself and why I love puzzles. I used to work in the ICU, where I faced many challenges and learned a lot. But when I retired, I felt like something was missing.

 

I wanted to keep my mind active and engaged. That’s when I discovered the benefits of puzzles. I read some studies that showed that puzzles can help improve memory, concentration, and cognitive skills, especially as we age. I was hooked. I started solving puzzles every day, and I enjoyed them so much that I decided to create my own. I made books of crosswords, cryptograms, sudoku, and word search puzzles, with different levels of difficulty and themes. I wanted to share my passion and knowledge with other puzzle lovers like you. Whether you are looking for a fun way to relax, a challenge to test your skills, or a learning opportunity to expand your horizons, you will find something for you in my books. Check them out and see for yourself.

 

I hope you enjoy them as much as I do. Thank you for visiting my website.

CreativeIdeaHeadSPbyBarsrsind.png

Word puzzles are like a mental gym for seniors

Sharper Memory

Solving puzzles, especially word puzzles, creates new connections between brain cells. It’s like doing push-ups for your mind. Plus, it’s been shown to improve short-term memory. So, next time you’re searching for that elusive word, know that you’re giving your brain a workout

Concentration Boost

As we age, opportunities to practice concentration become scarcer. But puzzles demand focus. Whether it’s finding words in a jumble of letters or completing crosswords, these activities engage parts of the brain that might otherwise take a nap. Plus, they’re perfect for seniors because they don’t involve a gazillion moving pieces like some board games do

Cognitive Reserve

Think of your brain’s cognitive reserve as a rainy-day savings account. Puzzles help build it up. This reserve can help fight age-related memory loss and even dementia. Pair your puzzle-solving with 150 minutes of exercise each week, and you’re golden. But hey, any activity counts—no need to run a marathon

Meaningful Engagement

Puzzles add substance to life. They’re not just letters on paper; they’re memories, stories, and moments. When you solve a puzzle, you’re connecting with something bigger—whether it’s a famous quote or a hidden gem of wisdom

Social Connection

Word search puzzles, for instance, are great for socializing. Gather your friends, huddle around a puzzle, and chat about life while hunting for words. It’s like a cozy coffee date with your brain

bottom of page